Spearfishing flashers

Spearfishing flasher:

Spearfishing flashers are pretty much an essential part of any overseas adventure into warmer waters. Used interchangeable between hunting reefs and open blue water although mainly for the later.

The flashers come in all shapes, variations and configurations but at their core are simply shiny bits of something or other, which simulate bait fish activity in the water and in turn attract bigger fish who come in looking for an easy meal but turn into yours.  This gives you the opportunity to drop down and get your shot.  The fish gets distracted by the flasher and you can use that to your advantage, get close and take the shot.

Especially in the big blue, where there is often nothing of interest for a fish to home in on, a shiny, bobbing flasher creates that distressed motion of bait fish jigging around.  The pieces (often metal) are designed to keep moving and catching the sun at various angles in a way that gets the fish intrigued.

Most people swim along the surface, gun in one hand with the flasher in the other, jigging as they go.  The flasher is attached to a small float via clear nylon line which can be wound up or released out to set it at different depths depending on the fish you are hunting or the level of your diving ability.

This depth varies greatly but could be 20 – 25m all the way up to 5m for people trying to get the fish really shallow for an easy shot.

The new Rob Allen ‘spinning top’ float is designed to do the jigging for you in a realistic manner so you can focus on the hunting.  It’s also quick and easy to adjust the depth while in the water wearing gloves etc

The flashers themselves are incredibly effective at attracting fish and last season after season.  Durability and effectiveness have proved themselves time after time.  We personally use them religiously to great success.

It’s worth pointing out that some fish are more prone to coming in on the flasher than others, and this can also vary between countries for the same species.  Wahoo and Amber Jacks love the flasher (albeit after learning how to get them intrigued), whereas yellowfin tuna on Ascension couldn’t seem to care less on most occasions.

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Spearfishing flasher:

Spearfishing flashers are pretty much an essential part of any overseas adventure into warmer waters. Used interchangeable between hunting reefs and open blue water although mainly for the later.
The flashers come in all shapes, variations and configurations but at their core are simply shiny bits of something or other, which simulate bait fish activity in the water and in turn attract bigger fish who come in looking for an easy meal but turn into yours.  This gives you the opportunity to drop down and get your shot.  The fish gets distracted by the flasher and you can use that to your advantage, get close and take the shot.

Especially in the big blue, where there is often nothing of interest for a fish to home in on, a shiny, bobbing flasher creates that distressed motion of bait fish jigging around.  The pieces (often metal) are designed to keep moving and catching the sun at various angles in a way that gets the fish intrigued.

Most people swim along the surface, gun in one hand with the flasher in the other, jigging as they go.  The flasher is attached to a small float via clear nylon line which can be wound up or released out to set it at different depths depending on the fish you are hunting or the level of your diving ability.

This depth varies greatly but could be 20 – 25m all the way up to 5m for people trying to get the fish really shallow for an easy shot.

The new Rob Allen ‘spinning top’ float is designed to do the jigging for you in a realistic manner so you can focus on the hunting.  It’s also quick and easy to adjust the depth while in the water wearing gloves etc

The flashers themselves are incredibly effective at attracting fish and last season after season.  Durability and effectiveness have proved themselves time after time.  We personally use them religiously to great success.

It’s worth pointing out that some fish are more prone to coming in on the flasher than others, and this can also vary between countries for the same species.  Wahoo and Amber Jacks love the flasher (albeit after learning how to get them intrigued), whereas yellowfin tuna on Ascension couldn’t seem to care less on most occasions.